Call Us Today! 815-936-0050 
www.inhedu.org

  Institute  of  Natural  Health  and  Education

     The most affordable, fully approved and high quality massage therapy program in Illinois

Chapter 26: Cardiac Medications and Massage

Posted by Cristy Chuparkoff on September 17, 2019 at 2:30 PM Comments comments (0)

Medication is commonly prescribed for heart disease and other cardiovascular disorders. Massage should be avoided during periods of medication changes and dose adjustments. Below are more considerations for statins and aspirin.

Statins lower cholesterol levels, but can also cause muscle and joint pain. They may also affect connective tissue integrity. If clients are on statins, massage therapy should be very conservative. Avoid deep tissue and vigorous massage. 

Aspirin is commonly used to avoid blood clots, and can increase the risk for bruising and internal bleeding. It may also inhibit platelet clumping which would affect ligament receptors. This could lead to reduced sensory feedback so that tissues might not tighten in response to a technique that was too aggressive and could result in damage. 



ch.19

Posted by Paige Issert on September 17, 2019 at 1:25 PM Comments comments (0)
1. I would wait til the contraindicated area is fully healed 2. After area is fully healed I would apply light pressure avoid blood clots, since the patient should have been on bed rest for the healing process. 3. After a year has gone by, I would execute a regular massage and apply light pressure to the contraindicated area unless client states other wise.

CH.18

Posted by Jazz on September 10, 2019 at 3:40 PM Comments comments (1)

 I personally do not like intaking medicine or even energy drinks at that. I feel like the elderly men should take a natural approach especially considering their age. With their age being taken into cosideration the growth horomone side - effects could have quite the impact. From gathering infromation I would say a pro would be new body cells. There is a few pros's and cons mentioned for growth horomone so everyones case is different. I wouldnt be quick to let it be the first option but I would recommend getting the most research before a person decides to take and what their reasons were for taking it.

ch. 18

Posted by Paige Issert on September 10, 2019 at 10:50 AM Comments comments (1)
****how do I feel about it's use: personally, I feel only in certain circumstances growth hormones should be used. example would be if an athlete was injured and needed to build muscle mass in a certain area then yes but to bulk up when your already a health individual and are looking for fast results, no. ****pros: this could benefit an individual that needs a boost in muscle mass, but all in moderation and a proper routine but not forever so that this individual is not abusing the substance. ****cons: an individual could potentially fully rely on this substance and that is an issue. Your body wants to retain homeostasis. If you keep using a growth hormone you have potential to over use and throw your body off of equilibrium. ****Personally, I would not take it. I do not have a need for it and if I had a need for it I prefer natural ways to stimulate my muscles.

ch. 18

Posted by Paige Issert on September 10, 2019 at 10:50 AM Comments comments (1)
****how do I feel about it's use: personally, I feel only in certain circumstances growth hormones should be used. example would be if an athlete was injured and needed to build muscle mass in a certain area then yes but to bulk up when your already a health individual and are looking for fast results, no. ****pros: this could benefit an individual that needs a boost in muscle mass, but all in moderation and a proper routine but not forever so that this individual is not abusing the substance. ****cons: an individual could potentially fully rely on this substance and that is an issue. Your body wants to retain homeostasis. If you keep using a growth hormone you have potential to over use and throw your body off of equilibrium. ****Personally, I would not take it. I do not have a need for it and if I had a need for it I prefer natural ways to stimulate my muscles.

Chapter 25: The Linen Police

Posted by Cristy Chuparkoff on September 10, 2019 at 9:25 AM Comments comments (1)

If a client notified me that they had a herpes sore and my linens were exposed, I would treat my linens as usual with univeresal precautions. We may not always know when someone has a contagious outbreak, so by treating every case as if it is we can minimize the spread of disease. 

Chapter 28: Indication or Contraindication?

Posted by Cristy Chuparkoff on September 10, 2019 at 9:15 AM Comments comments (1)

If I noticed swollen lymph nodes on a client's neck and armpits during a massage, I would discontinue the service and ask them to reschedule. Swollen lymph nodes usually indicate an infection, and I would suggest they consult with their doctor. I think this would be easier said than done, since it might feel awkward to stop a massage in the middle of a treatment. However, in the interest of the client getting the proper care, as well as protecting myself and other clients, reschedling is what I feel would be most appropriate in this instance.

CH. 10

Posted by eriddle on September 9, 2019 at 9:05 AM Comments comments (0)
The Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act of 1996 (HIPAA) protects health care consumers??? privacy and stipulates certain rules be adhered to on the part of healthcare providers. Yes, it is absolutely important for massage therapists to be compliant with HIPAA as we are considered to be a provider. . Massage therapists use important patient information to do the job and it is important to safeguard this information as well as for the fact that massage therapy notes are a treatment and can be used within the law and can be subpoenaed. The fact that we complete an intake and a history and document the treatment this makes for the need to be HIPPA compliant.

Chapter 10, Discussion

Posted by Lydia Brown on September 8, 2019 at 11:45 AM Comments comments (0)

HIPAA does apply to massage therapists in Illinois. I agree that client's records and information needs to be secure and private and clients should be able to expect confidentiality from their massage therapist. HIPAA applies to the massage therapy profession unless the therapist does not have a business and is only providing massage for free to clients and friends periodically and does not transmit client records electronically. According to Massage Magazine April 19, 2016 article "What You Need toKnow About HIPAA Requirements" HIPAA applies to healthcare providers and "the US Department of Health and Human Services' definition of a health care provided is 'any person or organization who furnishes, bills, or is paid for healthcare in the normal course of business'--and any healthcare provider who transmits client records electronically in relation to any healthcare claim does need to be HIPAA compliant." (massagemag.com) I feel the most important regulations for a massage practice are licensing, continuing education regulations, and HIPAA to ensure that therapists meet standards of competency and professionalism in the field is maintained to safeguard and promote the respect and reputation of the profession.

CH. 9

Posted by eriddle on September 8, 2019 at 9:45 AM Comments comments (0)

According to the CDC "To date, studies have shown that there is no added health benefit for consumers (this does not include professionals in the healthcare setting) using soaps containing antibacterial ingredients compared with using plain soap". (https://www.cdc.gov/handwashing/publications-data-stats.html)

The CDC's website has many articles on studies about the efficacy of antibacterial soaps and they do conclude that for normal handwashing the use of antibacterial soap in unnecessary. It is also stated in a few of these articles that the use of Triclosan which is an ingredient in antibacterial soaps is causing some harm and that some antibacterial soap ingredients can cause resistance to some types of bacteria.